AirBnB in Japan to Never be the Same Again!

What’s happening with AirBnB in Japan this month?

I just a few weeks ago put in a reservation for Sasha’s Mom to come out and see us later this month (June 2018). But just today I got an e-mail from AirBnB basically stating. HEY! The Japanese government just got rid of a bunch of competition, people can not freely rent out their apartment or homes any longer… without a… LICENSE! Go figure. This seems to be another punch to the gut for free markets and competition. Lyft and Uber are not allowed here in Japan either, go figure.

There are some people that will end up with a license, but no doubt they will charge out the roof for a place now. Hostel’s still seem to be functioning okay. I guess we’ll see if this truly is the death of AirBnB in part here in Japan.

Hi Nathan,
We’re writing with an important update about your upcoming stay in Japan. Unfortunately, your reservation on 2018-06-16 has been canceled. We’re deeply sorry, as we know how surprising and frustrating this news is so close to your trip.

Below, we’ve listed important information about refunds, credits, and assistance to help you find alternative accommodations in Japan.

Full refund and coupon
We’re here to help make this last minute change as easy for you as possible. In addition to a full refund, you’ll receive a coupon worth twice your reservation value to use on a trip within the next year.

We’ll also provide you with an Airbnb coupon to use on any Airbnb Experience worth up to $100.

Your refund and coupons will be sent within the next few days.

Reason for cancellation
Japan recently passed a law that regulates home sharing. In order to comply, all hosts are required to register their listing and display an approved notification number on their listing page by June 15th.

On June 1st, the Japanese government unexpectedly instructed us that any host without a valid number should cancel all upcoming reservations. Unfortunately, your reservation on 2018-06-16 is booked at a listing that hasn’t received a valid number.

This is understandably frustrating, as many hosts are working hard to acquire their licenses as quickly as possible. However, given the unknown timelines—and because your trip is coming up so soon—we believe it’s best to cancel your reservation and obtain other accommodations as soon as possible.

Finding a new place to stay
In the event that you can’t find a home that meets your needs on Airbnb, JTB—a leading travel agency in Japan with access to other accommodations—is available to assist with finding a new place to stay. Please visit JAPANiCAN if you want their assistance.

We’re here to help
We’ve also set up a fund to cover unexpected and unavoidable expenses that are incurred as a direct result of this cancellation– such as flight change fees.

Our team is standing by to help if you have questions or concerns. Please reach us by calling 1-855-424-7262 or emailing us at japanguestsupport@airbnb.com.

Once again, we sincerely apologize for this situation, as well as for the disruptive inconvenience it poses for you and your host. Unfortunately, these circumstances developed outside of our control, but we’re here to help resolve this issue as quickly as possible.

Thank you,

Airbnb Support for Japan

Japanese Transitive and Intransitive Verbs

Japanese Transitive and Intransitive Verbs

transitive verbsYou may or may not have heard these words before, and you may or may not know what they mean. Transitive means that something is being done by someone (or something). AKA, transitive verbs are the ones that you (or someone/something else) has direct influence on. When beginning to learn a language, transitive forms are used since most people talk about things they do/ are doing or things other people are doing. Examples of transitive verbs are: I opened the door, I returned the boy home, I made the cat disappear.

Intransitive means that something happens/ed on it’s own. For example, the door opened, the boy returns home, the cat disappears.

In Japanese, transitive verbs use the particle を with the action (verb) following the particle, and what is being affected by the verb before the particle. For example, when you say that you eat a banana, the banana is what is being affected by the verb, so therefore it proceeds the particle and the verb to eat follows the particle. Some people have a hard time with the verb 紹介します (しょうかいします) where the person you are introducing (to someone) follows the を particle and the person you are introducing someone TO follows the particle に because they are having something done TO them (similar to something being given TO someone with the verbs あげます).

Intransitive verbs use the particle が because there is only a subject and an outcome (verb), so basically something happened. Hajimeru 始める vs hajimaru 始まる (to begin [something] vs. [something] began), I have remembered that hajimaru is the intransitive verb which uses GA because I connected the MA to being similar to GA. Also, “I woke up” would be intransitive because it automatically happened, versus “I woke someone up” which would be transitive because you are doing an action.

I may come back to this article in the future and add some more insights once I formally learn about transitive and intransitive verbs, but for now this will do I think ^_^

I suggest you check out my Japanese Verb Conjugation post lesson here, for more on the Japanese language.

Better Ways to Learn Japanese Fluently

–Nihon Scope

How to Understand “Japanese Sentence Structure”

Japanese sentence structure:

Japanese sentence structure can be confusing because in Japanese you can arrange bits of information in various orders within a sentence as long as certain words remain connected to particles. In Japanese, the subject is always either at the beginning of the sentence or is already known and is left out of the sentence. When the subject is declared at the beginning of the sentence, it is followed by either は or が or も depending on whether you are talking about something (は) or answering a question of who/what, or specifying who/what did/had/has/went/came/saw/etc (が) or if the subject also did/had/went/saw/came/etc (も).

If you don’t know Hiragana or Katakana or Kanji learn it here for FREE.

Take the sentence: I came to Japan which in Japanese Is わたしは日本にきました。Which can also be said as 日本にきました with わたしは (the subject) omitted because if you are saying it, the fact that you are the subject is inferred. But if you want to specify who came to Japan, you would say whoever came with the particle が to emphases that it was them who came. The point of the sentence is always at the end, whether it be the verb (what is being done) or an adjective (describing the subject) or a noun (stating what something is).

Now if you wanted to add some additional information to this sentence (any of the 5W’s in English), like who you came with or how you came, or when you came, or why you came, you can include those bits of information anywhere in the sentence as long as every piece remains connected to the correct particle. For example, bits of information such as {「ひとりで」 or 「ともだちと」 or「 かぞくと」} or「(a specific date) に」「(method of transportation) で」「(explanation of why) から」can all be arranged in any order as long as the subject stays at the beginning and the point at the end.

わたし is followed by either は(if you are talking about yourself), or が(if you are the person who did/had/has/was/went/etc.), or も(if you also did/had/went/saw/came/etc.), or と(if you are talking about someone else but you were also included), or に(if you are the recipient of the verb {something was given TO you or said TO you} depending on the sentence. The noun being affected by the verb is always connected to the particle that goes with the verb. I have written a post about verbs with a section about particles used with specific verbs other than the usual verb particle を. So in this sentence 日本 and に have to remain connected, and the sentence will always end with the verb (in this case, adjectives in others).

If you don’t know Hiragana or Katakana or Kanji learn it here for FREE.

Better Ways to Learn Japanese Fluently

English sentance structure and Japanese sentance structure

Making comparisons in Japanese

The main words used for making comparisons in Japanese are: より and のほが. To best understand, think of the definition of より to mean “compared to”and のほが to mean “more (or in English “er” than)”. Whatever is connected to より is the subject of comparison, and whatever is connected to のほが is what is more (whatever adjective) than.

The sentence アメリカのほがおおきいです。Means that America is bigger. Bigger than what, we don’t necessarily know, but if you were to include 日本より either before or after アメリカのほが, we would know that we are comparing America to Japan because 日本より means “compared to Japan”. So, 日本よりアメリカのほがおおきいです。Or アメリカのほが日本よりおおきいです。Are two different ways to say that compared to Japan, America is bigger (or America is bigger than Japan).

Another example of a comparison sentence using より but not のほが is when you are taking a statement and adding the fact that compared to something else, that statement remains. For example, アメリカはおおきいです。America is big. This general statement is true, and if we add the comparison of Japan for instance, the fact would remain true, so we can add 日本より before or after アメリカは. But if you put 日本より first, it then becomes the subject and therefore アメリカは would change to アメリカが because it is now being emphasized that being compared to Japan, America is what is big, or in other words it is answering the question of what is big compared to Japan. So, 日本よりアメリカがおおきいです。Or アメリカは日本よりおおきいです。

Nihon Scope

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