Difference Between – To Give Birth, To Be Born & Birthplace in Japanese

An Easter Japanese Lesson About Birth Born and BirthplaceAn Odd Coincidence – A Japanese Lesson About Birth on Easter.

In light of the Easter holiday I find this lesson to be very interesting, because the day I finally decide to get these three words straightened in my mind it falls on Easter, and what’s more appropriate then words revolving around birth?

So I’ve been getting these words on WaniKani.com for awhile now and I’ll start to understand them then… NOPE, I’ll see one and think it’s the other and since I’ve not had any real reason to use these words with anyone or even myself or my wife they quickly get mixed up, so here is an attempt to make sure that they can be remembered moving into the future. Perhaps I’ll have more opportunities to use these words since I now live in Japan, but I got to know them first :).





  1. UMU – 生むーうむ:To Give Birth
  2. UMARE – 生まれーうまれ:Birthplace
  3. UMARERU – 生まれるーうまれる:To Be Born

So the best way to remember UMU is by adding a bit more to it to remember it.

By the time you are going to give birth, it’s too late to turn back, U MUst be ready to give birth, you don’t have a choice.

To remember UMARE is by changing it a bit to be pronounce in English U-MAR-E

Your birthplace will usually dictate where YOU get (U) MARRIED (MA-RE) at.

UMARERU is a fun one to remember, but you got to break it up a bit. Think of the famous giraffe that was pregnant forever and what the mother was constantly thinking.

UM…? ARE YOU (UM… ARE (/R) U) ever going to be born?


Learning new words in Japanese
Perhaps these are not the very best ways for you to remember how to think of these. If these don’t sit, then take a couple minutes and think of some ways to remember these on your own. The best way to remember anything in a new language is to do space repetition and to create stories around the words. They work even if you have to break the rules of the language at times just to remember the spelling/word. Click here to check out my favorite programs online for free.

-Nihon Scope

 

 

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Easy Kanji Mix-Ups: Husband, End & Not Yet

Kanji Mix-Up’s – Matsu, Mi & Otto/Husband

These three were giving me trouble for a little bit on Wani-Kani so I’m going to do a quick exposé of the characters and maybe some ways to help you remember them.





Character Otto Husband in JapaneseThis is the character for husband. Now it’s a fairly simple character but for me at least once the two other characters came in, I started to not notice why I kept getting all these wrong and at times calling the other characters this and this character the other words.


Different between matsu and mi end and not yetNow here is the culprits that caused me to keep mixing things up. On the left is ‘Not Yet‘ and the right is ‘End‘ in Japanese Kanji. So when you compare husband to this, you’ll notice that the difference is not having the tail stroke coming down the middle like it is on ‘End’ and ‘Not Yet’.


Another thing I noticed that makes ‘Not Yet’ and ‘Husband’ different is the length of the top horizontal stroke. But the biggest give away is still not having the middle tail stroke coming down the middle. So noticing that will obviously help solve that mystery of ‘Husband’ and ‘Not Yet’. But when going through flash cards or Wani-Kani, you may at times in the beginning figuring out these two.

Now in Wani-Kani they first teach ‘Not Yet’ as the radical ‘Jet’, like a plane. After getting these wrong for a while, I decided to give it a better story. So I took the radical ‘Jet’ and the story goes:

“You get on a jet-plane and when you first step on the plane you notice your seat is in the way back, so you’re ‘Not Yet’ to your seat, but by the time you get to your seat you’re at the ‘End’ of the plane.”

So you can see the tiny stroke as an indicator of where you are on the plane.

Silly and possibly a tad stupid, yes. But, that’s what helps you remember the kanji!

-Nihonscope

 

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