Category Archives for Pro’s and Con’s of Japan

Is It Really Illegal to be Fat in Japan?

Illegal Fat People in Japan?Is Being Fat in Japan Really Illegal?

(I’ve been informed that it’s not a law to get measured once a year – please scroll this forum to learn more – below is the original article)

So what exactly is this fat tax everyone is talking about from Japan? Is it real? Is it really illegal to be fat in Japan? Well, first off, yes it is real, there is a sort of ‘fat’ tax that is applied for those over a certain BMI/waistline in Japan (85 cm for men and 90 cm for women). But you’ll never see anyone actually arrested for being fat… Fined, absolutely, but not the individual themselves, companies are the ones who take the hit. Japan requires it’s citizens between 40 and 74 years of age to get their BMI/waistlines measured once a year, and if need be seek medical attention and counseling.

It's possible to learn Japanese while watching your favorite anime

The law is actually called (get ready for it):

“Standard Concerning Implementation Special Health Examination
and …
Special Public Health Guidance”

Otherwise known as ‘Metabo’ law, started in 2008 to combat ‘metabolic syndrome” and to curb the country’s overweight population by at least 25% by 2015. So with that said, has it worked? It has actually, it’s dropped the obese rate of Japanese people by 1% since it started.  So Japan put out all the stops to help curb any excess fat that they can from society.

But already Japan has a few things going for them that Americans simply don’t. First Japanese people already eat a diet full of fish, vegetables and rice, whereas Americans literally are loading up on ultra-processed foods 50% of the time! Second is that Japanese people by default end up having to walk much more then Americans, and are encouraged to do so. Americans simply for the most part do not have the ability to leave their house and walk into a city as many Americans live on the out skirts of cities.

Thin Japanese Family Eating TogetherThen third the Japanese now have the Metabo law to help reinforce and help curb what they consider an epidemic of fatness! Americans, have nothing of the sort, and honestly it would be unconstitutional to do so. Instead America would be best to keep teaching individuals how to eat and what to avoid, because half of their food being eaten is absolutely trash.

So what do the stats looks like for overweight people in Japan, and did they really need to implement this law? Well the answer shouldn’t surprise you, but here are some numbers and a few facts regarding overweight people Japan vs America.


Obese American Family In Front of TVOnly 3.6 percent of Japanese people have a body mass index (BMI) over 30 (which I now believe is 3.1 percent), which is the international standard for obesity, whereas 35.7 percent of Americans do. A total of 33.1 percent of Americans have a BMI over 25 (discounting those in the obese category), making them overweight, but only 21.1 percent of Japanese make the grade to be considered overweight (discounting those in the obese category)!


Lets look at this in the raw numbers to see how absolutely insane this really is:

Obese Japanese People: 4,500,000
Obese American People: 101,000,000!

Overweight Japanese People: 31,000,000
Overweight American People: 105,250,000

Total overweight and obese:

Total in Japan: 31,100,000
Total in America: 218,750,000

So I’d say Japan is doing something right when you compare it to America right? But let’s be fair and look at the numbers if they were to have the same amount of people, but let’s look at it if America had as many people as Japan.

Total in Japan: 31,100,000
Total in America (same pop. as Japan): 86,668,000

In this made up chart America would still have over 50,000,000 more people that are overweight. This would also mean that out of the 126,000,000 people only about 45,000,000 would be healthy which is about 1/3 of the population.


Japanese Population: 126,000,000
American Population: 318,000,000 – (Feb 9th 2017)


Japanese Guide Book

Check this guide out for more interesting facts about Japan!

So as you know the law is not coming to take you to jail if you’re too fat in Japan, they’re not going to come slap handcuffs on you or force you into fat camp. Although you will be required to see a counselor and a dietician to help you curve that hefty waistline, that is if you even show up for your appointment.

So, is that it? You pretty much just get a slap on the wrist and a bit of mandatory counseling? Well, yes and no. The biggest effects from this law stem from companies who employee bigger people. The big punishments are really being felt by the companies of Japan. If they find ANY of their employees are big boned and over the limit they can be fined a fair sum of money until everyone has a come to Jesus meeting and gets a grip and slims down. Companies actually hand out ‘Metabo’ towels that have a measurement stitched into the towel so you can see if you’re gaining weight or if you’re losing it. Otherwise to basically help you remember that if you’re overweight your a burden on the companies well-being.

One fine a company was said to pay was upwards of $19,000,000 dollars! This is why you will see companies doing a set of work outs in the morning before they start work. 30 minutes of stretching they say help keep everyone a bit more fit, and they also found that it keeps their employees more focused on their tasks. But not everything is as it seems, this program that seems to have well intentions (which I agree to a point), doesn’t have everyone’s best interests. Because of this, people that are bigger are shunned and made fun of and verbally abused, and this attitude also leeches into the public and private lives as well, but besides the emotional and societal backlash, did Japan really need to enact this law?

Large American Couple Eating Poorly Chosen FoodsA professor at Tokai college School of Medicine, Yoichi Ogushi said that there really is no need for Japanese people to lose weight.  Yoichi Ogushi was noted saying that he does not think it will have any positive long lasting effect. He also said something like the Metabo law would work best in areas like the USA or Australia and other places that actually HAVE a weight problem. At this moment he said the Japanese people are too slender and they can’t afford to lose weight.

But on the other hand the president of the Health Policy Institute of Japan, James Kondo, believes that this law is a positive thing. He claims that the check up every years increases the public’s awareness of the health challenges that come with obesity and the metabolic syndrome.  Okay well if you agree with it or not it’s something that Japan is really doing. But there are a few criticisms and flaws of this policy that should be pointed out:

  1. The measurements done around the waist do not always give an accurate measurement of persons body fat.
  2. The law totally avoids childhood obesity, which is where most weight challenges occur in life.
  3. Companies discriminate against people who are a tiny bit overweight or not overweight at all, thinking they could become over weight
  4. Less than 50% of the people attend the required checkups
  5. Of those who do that are found to go and have a weight issue, only about 12% of the people who received counseling even took the advice or even acted on it.

So, there’s that…

But the more I researched this subject the more I ran into a lot of research showing that men, women but mostly girls are taking this to the next level and basically starving themselves. More and more eating disorders are taking place in Japan and Metabo law has certainly not helped curb this growing challenge that is taking place in Japan. There is even stories I’m reading about where children are indoctrinated into believing eating too much can turn you into a pig, and it’s seen as heroic to not eat!

Well, perhaps at one point in Japanese history when food was a scarce thing, these kind of stories came up, and then they just got pass on down from generation to generation. But these children stories are not doing anyone any good. So there could be much more research into how deep this really goes, because as already mentioned, why not tackle childhood obesity too? Well many believe and I tend to also bend towards the idea that big pharmaceutical companies have a play in this role in this Metabo law decision. Japan has the 2nd largest pharmaceutical market in the world.

With that said the profits between 2008 a year before Metabo and 2012 show a drastic increase.

Better Ways to Learn Japanese Fluently

To end this endless rabbit hole of questions and points of view about this Metabo law, there was a question I had about this. What about sumo wrestlers? Are they stuck with the same law as everyone else? And the answer is, YES! They are stuck with having to give up the gut as there time arrives when they turn 40. But it’s also interesting to note that the oldest wrestler to win a top division sumo championship was 37 years of age (Kyokutenho Masaru). So the vast majority of these wrestlers will never have to worry about it. But, I wonder though about those who have to work hard to get themselves below the thresholds of the Metabo law in time, when for most of their lives they’ve been commended for being a big fat wrestler.

-NihonScope

https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-statistics/Pages/overweight-obesity-statistics.aspx
https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2016/03/less-than-3-percent-of-americans-live-a-healthy-lifestyle/475065/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fat_tax
http://www.snopes.com/politics/medical/metabolaw.asp
https://broadly.vice.com/en_us/article/why-eating-disorders-are-on-the-rise-in-japan

AirBnB in Japan to Never be the Same Again!

What’s happening with AirBnB in Japan this month?

I just a few weeks ago put in a reservation for Sasha’s Mom to come out and see us later this month (June 2018). But just today I got an e-mail from AirBnB basically stating. HEY! The Japanese government just got rid of a bunch of competition, people can not freely rent out their apartment or homes any longer… without a… LICENSE! Go figure. This seems to be another punch to the gut for free markets and competition. Lyft and Uber are not allowed here in Japan either, go figure.

There are some people that will end up with a license, but no doubt they will charge out the roof for a place now. Hostel’s still seem to be functioning okay. I guess we’ll see if this truly is the death of AirBnB in part here in Japan.

Hi Nathan,
We’re writing with an important update about your upcoming stay in Japan. Unfortunately, your reservation on 2018-06-16 has been canceled. We’re deeply sorry, as we know how surprising and frustrating this news is so close to your trip.

Below, we’ve listed important information about refunds, credits, and assistance to help you find alternative accommodations in Japan.

Full refund and coupon
We’re here to help make this last minute change as easy for you as possible. In addition to a full refund, you’ll receive a coupon worth twice your reservation value to use on a trip within the next year.

We’ll also provide you with an Airbnb coupon to use on any Airbnb Experience worth up to $100.

Your refund and coupons will be sent within the next few days.

Reason for cancellation
Japan recently passed a law that regulates home sharing. In order to comply, all hosts are required to register their listing and display an approved notification number on their listing page by June 15th.

On June 1st, the Japanese government unexpectedly instructed us that any host without a valid number should cancel all upcoming reservations. Unfortunately, your reservation on 2018-06-16 is booked at a listing that hasn’t received a valid number.

This is understandably frustrating, as many hosts are working hard to acquire their licenses as quickly as possible. However, given the unknown timelines—and because your trip is coming up so soon—we believe it’s best to cancel your reservation and obtain other accommodations as soon as possible.

Finding a new place to stay
In the event that you can’t find a home that meets your needs on Airbnb, JTB—a leading travel agency in Japan with access to other accommodations—is available to assist with finding a new place to stay. Please visit JAPANiCAN if you want their assistance.

We’re here to help
We’ve also set up a fund to cover unexpected and unavoidable expenses that are incurred as a direct result of this cancellation– such as flight change fees.

Our team is standing by to help if you have questions or concerns. Please reach us by calling 1-855-424-7262 or emailing us at [email protected].

Once again, we sincerely apologize for this situation, as well as for the disruptive inconvenience it poses for you and your host. Unfortunately, these circumstances developed outside of our control, but we’re here to help resolve this issue as quickly as possible.

Thank you,

Airbnb Support for Japan

Learn How to Drink for Less in Japan!

The More You Know About Drinking Booze for Cheap in Japan the Better!

Was published here as a guest post, decided to share it here too!

Japan is a mysterious and wondrous place that I believe that everyone should check out at least once throughout their life. The beauty of the island can bring almost a tear to one’s eye. But after seeing the sights of the day, there is a common theme that everyone loves to do in Japan. Go out to eat! Many times the locals will visit a local izakaya, which is similar to a gastropub. You can sit in the midst of the locals while ordering popular dishes like yakisoba, yakitori, okonomiyaki, ramen, sushi or even get some western delicacies like a hamburger (which isn’t the same as you’re used to) or a pizza.

In many of these izakaya’s (and many restaurants), you’ll find an option where you can drink yourself under the table for 90 minutes of non-stop drinks. It’s called nomihodai. It’s a favorite choice for the locals, but it’s something that westerns are anxious to try as they’ve never heard of such a thing, and because of that, you can almost see the cringe in the person’s face who owns the izakaya/restaurant when a group of westerns orders nomihodai. Japanese usually use some restraint when ordering nomihodai (not all mind you), westerns will leave not remembering how they got there.

Better Ways to Learn Japanese Fluently

Nomihodai usually costs (depending on the location) around ¥1,500 to ¥2,500 yen or around $15 to $25. There is usually different levels of nomihodai you can purchase. There are usually two distinct options; you can get all you can drink shochu highball soda drinks, wine and happoshu beer (or what I like to call fake beer). Then there is usually an option where you can order sake and nama biru, which is draft beer (or what I like to call REAL beer), I would say unless you’re a wine drinker you should take the second option, your liver will thank you.

Many of the times you’ll be required to have a certain amount of people in your group order nomihodai as well as having a minimum food order. So as you may think ordering a nomihodai could be the best bet, you’ll have to factor in multiple people and food order. So if you’re planning on going out with a group and ordering food, this would no doubt be your best bet. But, still, in the end, you’ll quickly put away $30-$50 a person for the night, which honestly is still not too bad considering you’re drowning your liver in lushish alcohol for 120 minutes non-stop WHILE eating.

But for those who don’t have that type of money but still want to have their alcohol kick and go out for the night, there is another trick that even local Japanese people don’t give much thought of, and it’s called pre-game. Well, at least that’s what some Americans here in Japan told me it’s called and they even admitted they don’t do it (but now are). Pre-game drinking is where you go to a コンビニ (convenience store) or a スーパー (supermarket) and purchase your beer or alcohol there first. The difference in price is pretty substantial. When you order a single beer in about any restaurant, a 12 oz glass of beer usually will run you about $5-$8. Where as you can get yourself a 16 oz can of beer from a スーパー (supermarket) for about $2.20 to $3 and about $2.90 to $3.60 at a コンビニ (convenience store).

So you can easily purchase around $10 in liquor and drink one or two of them before entering and then “step out” of the restaurant when you want to crack the next one and down it and go back in. I will never personally open a beer inside their business as I believe that’s stepping over the line, and perhaps this way of drinking for less in Japan might bend people’s ethic muscles a bit. I think it’s fair enough though, and people bring their own cigarettes so why not bring your own beer and step out for a minute? So when you save that extra money, you’ll be able to order more food in the long run, or not have to order as much just to drink while drinking out in Japan. Thus, saving you TONS of money drinking while in Japan.

Nihon Scope

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